Vibration Research- Speaking Events

2018 Speaking Event Schedule


Kevin Van Popering

A Primer on Fatigue Damage Spectrum (FDS) for Accelerated and Reliability Testing

May 1, 2018; Tuesday 1:15pm to 3:15pm Unique Testing Applications and Methods session

Caribe Royale, Orlando, FL

Kevin Van Popering will be presenting at the ESTECH 2018

 

Abstract: Products experience a variety of vibration stresses in their end-use environment. Eventually, the accumulation of these stresses, or the accumulated fatigue damage, causes a failure in the product. New features in random vibration testing can reliably simulate the full life-cycle of a product in its end-use environment. This innovative process includes the ability to combine many different vibration environments into the same test profile, as well as accelerate the vibration test. Utilizing this method can aid in identifying whether test environments damage a product in the same frequency range as the end-use environment.


Pavel Fiser

Vibration Testing: Sine vs. Random

May 22-24, 2018

Brno Technical University, Brno, Czech Republic

Pavel Fiser will be presenting at the JVE Int'l Conference on Vibroengineering

 

Abstract: Frequently, our customers will request advice on which of type of test to run on their product; in particular, how to choose between the two most common test types: sine or random. Their desire is to know which test, sine or random, is best to most quickly pinpoint flaws in their product. If they can only run one test, either sine or random, which should it be?


John Holler

A New Method of PSD Estimation

May 23, 2018; Wednesday at 3:15pm

Pasadena Convention Center, Pasadena, California

John Holler will be presenting at the Space Tech Expo USA.

 

Abstract: it is vital that a random test consistently meets power spectral density (PSD) requirements throughout the test. By nature, random averaging requires time to present in-tolerance and smooth spectral lines. This presentation discusses Vibration Research’s newly developed method of PSD estimation, iDOF®, which provides an accurate and smooth PSD estimate without requiring traditional averaging time. This is the best method available to ensure that a random vibration test meets PSD requirements throughout the test.


Holger Boller

Comparison HALT HASS Test with a Random Vibration Test

June 6, 2018; 2:00pm to 3:40pm

Landesmesse Stuttgart GmbH, Hall 8, Stuttgart, Germany

Holger Boller will be presenting at the Automotive Testing Expo

 

Abstract: For electronic products, required vibration tests are continually getting longer. Because HALT HASS testing is also required, a reasonable question is ‘Can HALT HASS indicate the likelihood that a product will pass a vibration test?’ A related question is how closely comparable the tests are in terms of generated mechanical loads. This presentation presents a comparison of fatigue stress introduced to a printed circuit board by industry standard HALT HASS and random vibration tests.


Ryan Becker

Analyzing Field Environments to Generate a New, Better Test

August 15-16, 2018

CENFORPE, São Bernardo do Campo, Brazil

Ryan Becker will be presenting at the Advanced Vehicle Engineering Symposium

 

Abstract: Is a current test method valid? Or are there other tests that could better represent a product’s end-use environment? How can existing test methods be compared to real world measurements? These questions are becoming more common in the testing industry. Creating a realistic replication of all potential field environments is a time-consuming task but undertesting a product can have serious implications for cost, reliability and safety. The focus of this case study is a product with a known failure mode that occasionally occurs in the field but has never been replicated using current industry standard tests in the lab. The goal is to generate a test more representative of the real-world, replicating the failure mode observed in the field. There are several comparisons addressed by the study. First, the original test standard comes into question as we compare the response of the product during vibration testing to actual field vibration recordings. Second, a new test is developed based on vibration data collected in a variety of field environments. Finally, the new test is validated by comparing the product’s vibration response to that of the field environments and replicating the same fatigue failure observed in the field via the new test in the laboratory.


Ryan Becker

Errors in Random Testing Due to Averaging

August 21-22, 2018

Sao Jose dos Campos Tech Park, Brazil

Ryan Becker will be presenting at the Aerospace Testing Conference & Expo

 

Abstract: The short duration random tests common in the aerospace vibration industry have several shortcomings due to the nature of random vibration testing. The test results are generally displayed using a Power Spectral Density (PSD) plot, which is generated by averaging the FFT of multiple frames of data. If the controller is not averaging data correctly or if the PSD is not an accurate representation of the current test status, it can result in an over or under test which is not truly representative of the end use environment. There are easy methods you can use to confirm the validity of the PSD for random vibration tests.


Aaron Offringa

Analyzing Field Environments to Generate a New, Better Test

August 27-29, 2018

Chicago, Illinois

Aaron Offringa will be presenting at the InterNoise 2018

 

Abstract: Is a current test method valid? Or are there other tests that could better represent a product’s end-use environment? How can existing test methods be compared to real world measurements? These questions are becoming more common in the testing industry. Creating a realistic replication of all potential field environments is a time-consuming task but undertesting a product can have serious implications for cost, reliability and safety. The focus of this case study is a product with a known failure mode that occasionally occurs in the field but has never been replicated using current industry standard tests in the lab. The goal is to generate a test more representative of the real-world, replicating the failure mode observed in the field. There are several comparisons addressed by the study. First, the original test standard comes into question as we compare the response of the product during vibration testing to actual field vibration recordings. Second, a new test is developed based on vibration data collected in a variety of field environments. Finally, the new test is validated by comparing the product’s vibration response to that of the field environments and replicating the same fatigue failure observed in the field via the new test in the laboratory.


John Holler

Sensor Calibration: The Calibration Process, Self-Calibration Benefits, and Common Errors to Eliminate

August 30, 2018; 1:00pm to 2:00pm

Oregon Convention Center, Portland Oregon

John Holler will be presenting at the NCSL International Workshop & Symposium

 

Abstract: This presentation describes back-to-back accelerometers and the process of using theses accelerometers to calibrate other sensors. The process is described using a step-by-step tutorial including customizable test setup, required equipment for calibration, and the other considerations that need to be made when conducting calibration procedures. The presentation logically walks the reader through the calibration process as if they were using a VR9500 vibration controller and VibrationVIEW software from Vibration Research Corporation. Other topics include basic accelerometer properties and definitions, piezoelectric sensor limitations and miscellaneous pitfalls associated with accelerometer calibration.


Kevin Van Popering

Analyzing Field Environments to Generate a New, Better Test

September 13, 2018; Thursday 9:00am

Novi, Michigan

Kevin Van Popering will be presenting at the Battery Show; Suburban Collection Showplace

 

Abstract: Is a current test method valid? Or are there other tests that could better represent a product’s end-use environment? How can existing test methods be compared to real world measurements? These questions are becoming more common in the testing industry. Creating a realistic replication of all potential field environments is a time-consuming task but undertesting a product can have serious implications for cost, reliability and safety. The focus of this case study is a product with a known failure mode that occasionally occurs in the field but has never been replicated using current industry standard tests in the lab. The goal is to generate a test more representative of the real-world, replicating the failure mode observed in the field. There are several comparisons addressed by the study. First, the original test standard comes into question as we compare the response of the product during vibration testing to actual field vibration recordings. Second, a new test is developed based on vibration data collected in a variety of field environments. Finally, the new test is validated by comparing the product’s vibration response to that of the field environments and replicating the same fatigue failure observed in the field via the new test in the laboratory.


Holger Boller

Comparison HALT HASS Test with a Random Vibration Test

October 16-17, 2018

Silence Hotel, Istanbul, Turkey

Holger Boller will be presenting at the Automotive Testing Expo Turkey

 

Abstract: For electronic products, required vibration tests are continually getting longer. Because HALT HASS testing is also required, a reasonable question is ‘Can HALT HASS indicate the likelihood that a product will pass a vibration test?’ A related question is how closely comparable the tests are in terms of generated mechanical loads. This presentation presents a comparison of fatigue stress introduced to a printed circuit board by industry standard HALT HASS and random vibration tests.


**More speaking events, tbd

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